Wednesday, November 29, 2006

INFORMATION PICKET

INFORMATION PICKET

WE WANT TO SEND THE MESSAGE THAT WE ARE PREPARED TO TAKE OUR CONCERNS TO THE PICKET LINE!

DATE: MONDAY DECEMBER 4TH

LOCATION: 5881 DUNN STREET (NIAGARA COLLEGE)

TIME: 12 NOON TO 1:30PM

We are meeting in the Avondale parking lot on the corner of Dorchester and Dunn

_____________________________________________________________________

PICKET PREPERATION PARTY

We need your help to prepare and get ready for our INFORMATION PICKET.

DATE: SATURDAY DECEMBER 2ND

LOCATION: OPSEU REGIONAL OFFICE 2285 HIGHWAY 20 FONTHILL

TIME: 10AM

Sunday, November 19, 2006

TORONTO STAR

http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&pubid=968163964505&cid=1163760487493&col=968705899037&call_page=TS_News&call_pageid=968332188492&call_pagepath=News/News



Niagara Parks workers vote to strike
Nov. 17, 2006. 02:06 PM
CANADIAN PRESS

NIAGARA FALLS, Ont. — Employees of the Niagara Parks Commission have voted 93 per cent in favour of strike action.

The head of the union's bargaining team says they want their employer to stop contracting out their jobs.

Colin MacKenzie says all the issues have been settled except for the contracting issue.

He says there is no point having improvements to wages, benefits or working conditions if the workers don't have a job.

The more than 500 parks commission employees in Niagara Falls, Ont., tend to the grounds, perform maintenance and operate restaurants and tours.

MacKenzie says the employees could be in a legal strike position by Dec. 31.

Nataional Union of Public and General Employees

http://www.nupge.ca/news_2006/n19no06b.htm

93% strike mandate to save jobs at Niagara Parks Commission

'There is no point having improvements to wages, benefits or working conditions if you don’t have a job.' - Colin MacKenzie

Niagara Falls (19 Nov. 2006) – Approximately 550 employees of the Niagara Parks Commission have voted 93% in favour of striking if necessary to save full-time and seasonal jobs.

The employees are members of Local 217 of the Ontario Public Service Employees UNION (OPSEU/NUPGE). Conciliation is scheduled to begin Dec. 6. The employees will be in a legal strike position by Dec. 31.

Colin MacKenzie, bargaining team chair, says the dispute boils down to one issue - contracting out. All other issues have been tentatively settled.

“This is all about stopping this employer from contracting out our jobs. The Niagara Parks Commission is systematically destroying jobs and replacing them with outside contracts,” he says.

“There is no point having improvements to wages, benefits or working conditions if you don’t have a job. Our members are adamant that we take a stand against this employer’s practice of contracting out our work. Niagara Falls lives on tourist revenue, and our members at the Parks Commission are the absolute best at what they do. To sell off our jobs to contractors who know nothing about this work will hurt Niagara Falls over the long term.”

The employees tend to the grounds and greenhouses, perform maintenance and operate restaurants, concessions and tours at one of Ontario’s busiest tourist attractions. NUPGE


Web posted by NUPGE: 19 November 2006

NIAGARA FALLS REVIEW/ST. CATHARINES STANDARD NOVEMBER 18 2006

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18,2006

Niagara Parks employees vote in favour of strike

(CP) - Employees of the Niagara Parks Commission have voted 93 per cent in favour of strike action. The head of the union's bargaining team says they want their employer to stop contract­ing out their jobs. Colin MacKenzie says all the issues have been settled except for the contracting issue. He says there is no point having improve­ments to wages, benefits or working conditions if the workers don't have a job. The more than 500 parks commis­sion employees in Niagara Falls tend to the grounds^ perform maintenance and operate restaurants and tours. MacKenzie said the employees could be in a legal strike position by Dec. 31.

Friday, November 17, 2006

Union members give 93 per cent strike mandate to save jobs at Parks Commission

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE November 17, 2006

Union members give 93 per cent strike mandate to save jobs at Parks Commission

NIAGARA FALLS – Employees of the Niagara Parks Commission have voted 93 per cent in favour of taking strike action in an effort to save full-time and seasonal jobs.

Colin MacKenzie, an employee of the maintenance center and chair of the OPSEU Local 217 bargaining team, said this contract is about one issue and one issue only.

“This is all about stopping this employer from contracting out our jobs,” MacKenzie said. “The Niagara Parks Commission is systematically destroying jobs and replacing them with outside contracts.”

All bargaining issues, with the exception of the contracting out issue, have been settled. But as Mackenzie points out, everything hinges on that language.

“There is no point having improvements to wages, benefits or working conditions if you don’t have a job,” MacKenzie said. “Our members are adamant that we take a stand against this employer’s practice of contracting out our work. Niagara Falls lives on tourist revenue, and our members at the Parks Commission are the absolute best at what they do. To sell off our jobs to contractors who know nothing about this work will hurt Niagara Falls over the long term.”

Over 550 employees at the Parks Commission tend to the grounds and greenhouses, perform maintenance and operate restaurants, concessions and tours at one of Ontario’s busiest tourist attractions.

The union will enter conciliation with the employer on Dec. 6, 2006. Employees could be in a legal strike position by Dec. 31.

- 30 -

Golfers may play, stay at Legends on the Niagara

Golfers may play, stay at Legends on the Niagara
Niagara Parks issues RFP for ideas to improve course

Robert Lapensee
Nov 13, 2006

NIAGARA FALLS -- Some type of accommodations could be in the works for Legends on the Niagara Golf Course as the Niagara Parks Commission looks for ways to round out the course as a world-class golf destination.

Niagara Parks issued a request for proposals to the private sector in early October with the hopes of getting ideas back on what it can do to improve Legends. The wording for the proposal request is unusually loose, said John Kernahan, general manager for Niagara Parks, because Niagara Parks is open to any ideas to ramp up the course already considered to be world-class.

"What is the next thing we need to do to attract more golfers to Niagara?" said Kernahan. "It's very much up to the proponents about what will be proposed."

The next likely step could very well be some sort of accommodation on site because other areas billed as golf destinations already offer "stay and play" golf resorts.

Legends Resorts in Myrtle Beach, positioned on the Grand Strand in South Carolina, offers golfers a place to stay in its golf villas surrounded by nine golf courses. Condos and town homes are also offered for sale around four nearby courses, Barefoot Resort and Golf.

A similar development is underway in Niagara, Grand Niagara Resorts. The $300-million development includes two golf courses, one already open, homes, condos and a hotel.

Kernahan said his hope, not that he is putting ideas in anyone's head, would include accommodations as well as some other high-end component which would add to the calibre of Legends on the Niagara, like an indoor, all-seasons practice facility.

"We recognized we need to offer more than just golf," he said.

Kernahan said the formula for making Niagara a golf destination is starting to work. When it opened in 2002, Legends recorded 11,000 rounds from people living outside the region. In 2006, Kernahan said outsider rounds have risen to almost 26,000.

Since Legends opened, other high-end courses have opened, including Grand Niagara and John Daly's signature course, Thundering Waters."They really just add to the inventory of wonderful golf courses," said Kernahan. "We want to keep the momentum going.

"This is new money coming in. This is good for tourism. This is good for jobs. And this is good for the community."

Regional Councillor Bill Smeaton said he is dead-set against the Parks Commission moving into the accommodations business, saying it's breaking a time-honoured commitment not to compete with private sector businesses.

"There's no way you can say it isn't competition," said Smeaton. "It is."

Smeaton said an understanding the Parks Commission would not compete against area accommodations and instead run its attractions, restaurants and gift shops has existed for years.

He said many accommodations in the area don't know what Niagara Parks is planning.

"I'm going to let them know in a hurry," said Smeaton. "It's a breach of what has been an understood trust."

But Kernahan said Niagara Parks is staying out of the accommodations business, opting instead to have a well-known, brand-name accommodator run the lodgings.

While he was only speculating what might be proposed, he said Niagara Parks will only accept a low-rise development on the property.

"It would have to be something that would fit in with a park setting," he said. "Glass and chrome just won't go."

The RFP closes this month.

Tuesday, November 07, 2006

E I BENEFITS IF THEIR IS A STRIKE

1. As a seasonal worker, who gets laid off regularly for the winter months and collects El during the layoff, am I eligible for El benefits if my regularly scheduled layoff occurs before to a strike or lockout? What happens when I perform strike duties and get strike pay during my lay off?

Yes, you may be eligible. Since your winter layoff is considered to be more than a short term layoff (i.e., more than one month) you are expected to be looking for work. You would be required to report your strike pay on your weekly El reporting cards. However, strike pay is not considered to be earnings for El purposes so it wiil not be deducted from your El benefits. However, remember that regular El is designed for people who have no jobs and are actively looking for work so reporting strike pay may cause El to check on your availability for work. If you spend too much time on strike duty, El may assume that you are not available for work and may cut you off.

2. As a seasonal worker, who gets laid off regularly for the winter months and collects El during the layoff, am I eligible for El benefits if my regularly scheduled lay off occurs after a strike or lockout begins? In other words, could I start my El benefits after the end of my contract?

No. Even though you normally would not being working in the winter and would not return to work until the next season, you would not be eligible for El benefits during a strike or lockout because the strike or lockout was the event that disentitled you to El benefits before you reached your normal layoff date. However, if your winter layoff has not ended when the strike or lockout is over, then you may be eligible to receive El benefits for the remainder of the time up to your return to work in the next season.

3. As a seasonal worker I was receiving regular El benefits prior to the strike/lockout. If I participate in a strike or lockout can I still receive my regular El benefits? What happens when I perform strike duties and get strike pay during my lay off?

Yes. You would be required to report your strike pay on your weekly El reporting cards. Strike pay is not considered to be earnings for El purposes so it will not be deducted from your El benefits. However, remember that regular El is designed for people who have no jobs and are actively looking for work so reporting strike pay may cause El to check on your availability for work. If you spend too much time on strike duty, El may assume that you are not available for work and may cut you off.

4. As a seasonal worker, what happens if I am scheduled to return to work during a strike?

Your regular El benefits end at the scheduled return date.

5. As a seasonal worker now collecting El benefits and without a scheduled return date will I continue to be eligible for El benefits during a strike or lockout?

Usually, yes. However, if the employer can convince El that there is a pattern of employment that shows that without the strike or lockout you would have been back to work, then El will cut you off.


8. As a seasonal worker, I received a phone call to return to work and signed a contract but I have only been scheduled for 2 days of work so far and I am not scheduled to work in the future. Am I eligible for El benefits during a strike or lockout?

It depends on the reason why you were not scheduled for more work. If it is because of a strike or lockout that you are not at work, then you would not be eligible for El benefits. On the other hand, if you had been recalled on an "on call" basis, then it would be harder for El to determine that you should be disqualified. Since this is not a dear cut situation, it would be best to apply for El and have them make the determination on your eligibility.

7. As a seasonal worker, I have been called back to work but I am only working 2 days per week. As a result, I am continuing to receive El benefits although my employment earnings are deducted from my El benefits. Am I eligible for El benefits during a strike or lockout?

If you are still working 40% of the week and receiving El benefits when a strike or lockout begins, then you would not receive El benefits for the 40% of the week that you are on strike or lockout but you could still maintain eligibility for the remaining 60%.

Don't forget that you would be required to report your strike pay on your weekly El reporting cards. Strike pay is not considered to be earnings for El purposes so it will not be deducted from your El benefits. However, remember that regular El is designed for people who have no jobs (or are less than fully employed) and are actively looking for work so reporting strike pay may cause El to check on your availability for work. If you spend too much time on strike duty, El may assume that you are not available for work and may cut you off.

Saturday, November 04, 2006

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT

Additional Agenda for November 16th meeting

-Discussion on negotiations

-Strike mandate vote

-Formation of related committees

-STRIKE TEAM

-FINANCE TEAM

-COMMUNICATIONS TEAM

-HARDSHIP RELIEF TEAM

-MOBILIZATION TEAM

Explanation of Strike Pay and Benefits

This does not mean we are going on strike. This is to pass on to our negotiation team that we are prepared to go on strike if necessary.

If fact the higher the strike vote the less likey we are to go on strike.

IT IS OF CRITICAL IMPORTANCE THAT YOU ATTEND THIS MEETING.

SHOW MANAGEMENT HOW MUCH YOU SUPPORT YOUR NEGOTIATING TEAM

Friday, November 03, 2006

Bridge expansion shouldn’t gobble up parkland: Redekop

Printed from the Niagara Falls Review

Bridge expansion shouldn’t gobble up parkland: Redekop

RAY SPITERI; John Robbins

Friday, November 03, 2006 - 02:00

Local News - Mayor Wayne Redekop says he supports shared-border management, but not if it comes at the expense of Fort Erie parkland.

Last month, town councillors were presented with a report recommending ratification of the Peace Bridge Expansion Project, which would include shared-border management as an alternative in a future draft environmental impact statement.

While council approved the report, an amendment proposed by Redekop - calling for shared-border management to not result in any parkland being removed from public domain - was defeated.

The Buffalo and Fort Erie Public Bridge Authority would first have to purchase adjoining parkland from the Niagara Parks Commission, if it wanted to expand the bridge’s Canadian plaza near Mather Arch to accommodate shared-border management, said bridge authority general manager Ron Rienas.

A shared-border management facility would see customs officers from Canada and the United States working out of the same plaza on the Canadian side of the river.

Preliminary plans show the Canadian plaza expanding into the park along the west side of Niagara Boulevard, sandwiched between Mather Arch and existing bridge lands, to accommodate U.S. customs inspections operations.

There has been talk the bridge might try to interest the parks commission in swapping some portion of the parkland for compensation down the road. About five acres of land would be required for shared-border management, said Rienas.

But Redekop was not budging.

“Shared-border management makes a lot of sense and I fully support the expansion of the Peace Bridge,” said Redekop. “I disagree, however, that acres of land need to be accumulated beyond what’s already there. I’m not prepared to support more parkland being included in this (project).”

Redekop said he doesn’t think the Department of Homeland Security, one of the partners in the project, really supports shared-border management.

“Regardless of that, shared-border management can work and work effectively and at this particular border.

“But any plan of that nature that isn’t founded on real requirements, I don’t think is manageable,” he said.

“I have indicated … my concern about the notion that we give up parkland in Fort Erie, so that they (Buffalo) can have more parkland.”

Rienas, however, has said the issue isn’t about shared-border management, only about putting the issue on paper to be included in a future draft environmental impact statement.

A shared-border management pilot project at the Peace Bridge was announced by top Canadian and U.S. federal government officials in December, 2004.

At the request of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the bridge authority began drafting preliminary designs to alter the Canadian plaza to accommodate U.S. customs operations.

Earlier this year, Homeland Security signed off on the design, giving the bridge authority the green light to move forward with detailed environmental examination of the plan.

Even after various studies are completed, there’s no guarantee shared-border management will be implemented, since the two federal governments have yet to finalize treaty terms.

Rienas said the bridge authority has “worked tirelessly” to reduce the amount of parkland that would be needed for the project.

“I believe we’ve been very successful to reduce the amount (of parkland), when you consider the Department of Homeland Security initially wanted 40 to 60 acres of land,” he said.

“When you take into consideration the requirements being imposed on other border crossings, I believe we’ve done remarkably well to come up with a plaza design that the Department of Homeland Security has, in fact, signed off on.”

He said the PBA has “explored every possible opportunity” as it relates to parkland, but unless additional land is found, shared-border management isn’t feasible.

NOVEMBER NEWSLETTER

General membership meeting Thursday November 16th at 7PM
Legion 479
Spring Street
Niagara Falls.

Stand up for your rights

A better workplace starts with YOU!

At this time, your team is in the process of negotiating a new collective agreement. Remember the process doesnt end with ratification. It is up to every member to police the agreement. You must read your copy of the collective agreement. You must know what your rights are, and when they are being violated. If you think something is wrong, but you arent sure, call a steward.

You can't assume that your manager or supervisor will automatically follow the rules set out in the agreement. Some dont feel the need to follow it, and some dont even know what the collective agreement says. If you are affected by a violation of the collective agreement, you need to bring it to the attention of your manager or supervisor. Make it clear that this is a complaint and you are willing to file a grievance if necessary.

Standing up for your rights doesn't make you a bad em­ployee. Standing up for your rights will not endanger your job. Violating your rights is a mistake made by your manager. Continu­ing to violate your rights after it has been brought to their atten­tion makes them a bad manager. If you are having a problem, please speak to a steward, but your responsibility doesnt stop there. Even a member ofyour executive cant solve a problem without your continued involve­ment. Every member must be prepared to stand up and ques­tion improper decisions. It's your rights being violated, and its your responsibility to question the violation. Further, if a brother or sister is fighting a violation in your work location, you must back them up. Remember, the rights of one member are your rights too. Keep the big picture in view and support your fellow union mem­ber. Never support thesuppression of your rights. These rights have been negotiated for you over the course of many years. Dont throw them away because of apathy or conven­ience

Therefore, when your new collective agreement is ratified, dont be complacent. Remember that for this document to continue to be relevant, we must ensure that it is being followed by man­agement and the union. Both sides sign the agreement and both sides must honour its provisions.

In solidarity

Barb Wilson



From the secretary's desk

I would like to take this opportunity to thank all my Union Brothers and Sisters for making me feel welcome and appreciated in my new position as Union Secretary.

I have spent the last two years as a steward and started attending membership meetings, OPSEU educationals and investing personal time reading our contract. There is so much to learn, but I find it very rewarding as I believe that knowledge is a powerful tool!

With our team presently in negotiations, I am hoping that you as Union members will become more involved and be more aware of your rights according to the contract. Our general membership meetings are a great way to meet members from other areas and to get answers to all your questions and set the record straight on the many rumours we know circulate throughout the Parks.

Please don't hesitate to ask your stewards for asistance when needed. I am looking forward to getting to know each of you.

In solidarity

Jenn Sanderson


The Budget for 2006-2007

Budget breakdown 05-06 proposed 05-06 Actual 06-07 Proposed

o




Item or description

Income: Rebates

$18,000.00

$13,404.65

$17,000.00 @

Expenses




Meetings: GMM, Exec & Stewards

$2,000.00

$2,226.75 @

$2,000.00

Educationals

$0.00

$0.00

$400.00

Alternate costs (Convention)

$1,500.00

$2,262.65

$l,500.00(il)

Bank Charges

$65.00

$60.39

$70.00

Postage

$2,000.00

$1,503.35

$1,900.00

Office supplies and printing

$2,000.00

$2,695.81(2)

$2,200.00

E-mail/ internet

$1000.00

$720.00 Q>

$720.00

Other meetings

$300.00

$105.5 1(§>

$300.00

Executive expenses

$9000.00

$7,500.00 (£)

$7,500.00

Sponsorships: Wreath

$65.00

$0.00 (T)

$65.00

Misc (CALM & Info membership)

$210.00

$110.00/3)

$210.00

Total Expenses

$18,140.00

$17,184.46

$16,865.00

Balance Remaining

($140.00)

($3,779.81) @

$135.00

Key to budget notations

1. Rebate amount lower due to timing of deposit of rebate cheque.

2. 5 General Membership, 6 Executive, 4 Steward

3. Increases in printing cost, 3 Newsletters

4. Only a portion of internet covered. Max of $15/monthover 12 months ($180per executive)

5. Constitutional Committee Human rights and JJE meetings

6. Lower due to reduced number of executive members

7. Was not contacted by Legion this year.

8. Did not join Labour council, Expect to next year, left monies in.

9. Defecit not truly reflective of totals because of timing of rebate deposit.

10. Left lower to reflect on lower numbers in bargaining unit.

11. Left amount at $ 1500 because there are no regionals in 2006.

12. Bank balance as of July 1,2005: $6091.53, with $725.04 in outstanding cheques

This budget was presented and voted on at the last General Membership meeting.


Committees

Negotiating Team: Colin MacKenzie, Shelley Reed, Gary Bird, Barb Wilson, Desiree Constantinides and Staff Rep Russ Ellerton

Human Rights Committee:! lan Mather, Fernando Fortino, Maureen Ellis and Barb Wilson

Constitution Committee: lan Mather, Colin MacKenzie, Barb Wilson, Anne Cunningham, Bill Burns and Dennis

Seasonal JJE: Barb Wilson, Veronica Fawcett, Robin Watson. (Alternate: Penny Berketa) Full time JJE Maintenance: Marie Stokes, Platch lammarino (Alternate: Bill Rudd)


White Elephants, the blues and working together

Well, somebody in Upper Management should be getting a promotion. A circus that wasnt drawing the crowds it expected, a French-fry truck that has had a very hard time breaking even, spending as many hours in the garage is it did in use, and a Totem Pole Park at the glen that can be added to the white el­ephant list that just keeps growing

The Parks is again crying the blues. Now the question is: has it truly been a bad year or is it just that we haven't been meeting or surpassing the huge proj ected profits?

A few years ago, (if I remember correctly it was during our last contract negotiations), Barb Amdt our former Human Resources Director said that "students are the back-bone of the Parks" Some incidents this year seem to back up this statement. Some of our sisters and brothers at the Distribution center had their days, shifts and hours cut because the stock wasn't moving. Now here is the kicker... The Parks found it necessary to cut bargaining unit members back, but didn't seem to have a problem finding work at other locations for the students who were working at the Distribution Center at the time. The student didnt lose any time. Our bargaining unit members weren't as lucky. According to management, the workers were not allowed to move to other locations because they hadn't been laid off and thus could not exercise their seniority

It seems like a no brainer to me, but if hours are reduced it should be the non-bargaining unit employ­ees that go first; and if there are hours available, they should go to the union workers to top up their normal hours. The Director and Managers of Human Resources are always on the Union to "work together1 to solve our problems. The treatment of our members at the distribution center indicate that maintaining profit margins is more important than maintaining good employee relations. It is hard to work together when the workers are constantly looking over their shoulders for the knife thrust to the back.

I wonder if the powers that be will ever realize that it is all of the full time and seasonal workers, whose conscientious efforts that keep mis ship afloat

In solidarity

lan Mother


The Big Question... and other updates

How are negotiations going? That's the big question lately. Well, you know as much as I do. What I do know is that our negotiating team will do their best. I am hoping that they will be able to give us a positive report at our next General Membership meeting, November 17th.

I have been harping at all of you to make sure that you are signed up members and have got a union card and number. You need a membership number to vote on our next contract, or if negotiations break down, to collect strike pay and benefits from OPSEU.

During our demand set meeting I got a strong message from those members present that, as well as a substantial wage increase, our members wanted better job security. We need better language to control contracting out and the new proliferation of 24-hour workers. These non­union workers are not only taking away members hours of work, they are unable to sustain much of a standard of living at such a limited income and are not protected by a collective agreement. It is important mat you ensure that you get your full allotment of hours of work in your classification before any hours are given to non-union employees

I'm sure that if we haven't already started hearing about it, we soon will. You know... how this was such a bad year that there is no money to cover any wage increases. This may well be true, we may never know, because we can't see the books. In the past 'golden age' of record profits, I dont recall any bonuses or better increases because we had such a banner year. The workers in the Niagara Parks keep pur standards the same, wether there are 4 million visitors or 14 million. We serve the public to the best of our ability. The Com­mission is not taking any suggestions from us, in fact it seems that they don't want us to know any of their plans for the future...until the day before the public announcement. Can you say Gondola... Why should we pay for their mistakes with our standard of living.

I would like everyone to take note that our local MPP Kim Craitor has reintroduced a bill in parlia­ment that would force boards and Commissions (like the Parks) to open their meetings to the public. At one time I had criticized Kim for what I felt was a lack of support for our concerns. I applaud Kim's bill and feel that it shows that Kim truly does hear our concerns and is trying to act on them.

The Parks may like to think they are a business that should be able to keep the general public in the dark, but they are not Sears or one of the auto-makers who answer to a limited number of shareholders. The Park is a governmenmt agency and therefore owned by the people of Ontario. We are all shareholders in our workplace

I recently had the opportunity to support the Unite-Here Union that represents our servers at a demonstration there were having on one of their member workplaces. (Canadian Niagara Hotels) It is important that we all try and show our solidarity with other Unions when they are in need. Some day we may need their support. Our Local is taking steps to join the Niagara District Labour Council and we plan on being active members. Joining this group will provide us with the knowledge, experience and re­sources that we may need in the near future.

See you in November.

In Solidarity

BillRudd


Attention all seasonals!


The following is a brief primer on your rights for transfers and extra work under the collective ageement.

One of the most frequent complaints that I hear is that some­one got a job that wasn't posted. Most of the time, the answer is that the job was seasonal. Under the contract, only full-time positions must be posted. In order to be considered for a seasonal position, you must apply to Human Re­sources for a transfer. The steps to apply for a transfer are ex­plained in Articles 41.02 and 41.03 in the collective agreement This application must be made before


December 31 st to be considered for the next season. If you do apply for a transfer please let someone on our local executive know so that we can check the transfer list and ensure the Park is complying with the contract

If you are interested in extra work, the process is as follows:

When you receive your lay­off notice, you have 48 hours to notify your director (or designate) that you wish to exercise your seniority (Article30.06). If you want to be considered for early recall in your department or extra work, then you must notify Human Resources in writing within 48 hours


of receiving your lay-off notice (Article 30.1 Oa). If you want to be considered for extra work outside of your depart­ment, the process is the same (Article 30.10d).

The paper with the boxes to check off which some of us are pre­sented with at the time of our lay-off notice will work for exercising your seniority. To be eligible for extra work however you must take the additional step of notifying Human Resource in writing. Remember to keep a copy of your application. Sometimes things get lost...

You have a contract...enforce it!

In solidarity

Barb Wilson